06/09/2013

A pound shop with a difference

By Philip Crewe

There’s something new in Selfridges. It’s the pop-up Poundshop.

A pound shop might conjure up images of tacky Christmas decorations and straight-to-video DVDs, but don’t worry- this is a pound shop with a difference. Its founders, George Wu, Sara Melin have created a discount store that aims to spread design to a wider audience by making it affordable.

The Poundshop has popped up all over the country, but this time it has teamed up with Selfridges’ Bright Young Things festival, which mentors emerging talents in design, fashion, art and food. All the products, including beetle tie- pins, animal place-setting holders, and coasters shaped like pieces of toast, are being sold for £1, £5. 

It’s great to see the Poundshop and Selfridges truly embracing new design talent. George Wu stressed that the Poundshop is not about making money. 'We provide a promotional platform for designers,' she says, 'so that hopefully bigger retailers will take them on.'

One of my ECHO colleagues convinced me to apply to take part in Selfridges’ Bright Young Things festival. I decided to provide my bird-shaped plywood doorstops (Mr. Jackdoor). Hand-making the same item more than 150 times was no walk in the park, but seeing my work in the shops has definitely made the hard work feel worthwhile.


Have a look at my profile on the Poundshop website here.

The shop is going to be around until October 23rd – so make sure you don’t miss out!

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